Cyber safety for one and all!

Over the Christmas holidays I spent some time looking at the Cyber Safety Agreement that each family and student sign upon their arrival at school.  By signing the agreement they signal their acceptance to abide by the school’s rules and procedures around using devices. After rewriting parts of the agreement I began to think about students and the world we live in. A couple of questions struck me: Do students truly understand the dangers of using devices, especially the Internet and social media? Do teachers appreciate the dangers and pit falls of using social media?

As I thought about the first of these two questions I began to search the Internet for resources that could help. Obviously, netsafe is an excellent resource but I wanted to see what else was ‘out there’. I found an excellent resource called Common Sense Education. They offer a range of excellent free curricula for schools to teach cyber safety.

As the saturation of technology only increases, I believe schools need to make their cyber safety teaching as effective as possible by involving the whole community. Inform parents and caregivers about what is being taught at school and advise on ways that they can help their children be safe online at home. Invite parents or caregivers from the community into school to hold workshops for other parents and students.

As I began to write a staff agreement for school I found www.teachersandsocialmedia.co.nz to be extremely helpful. Social media can be such a powerful tool for teachers when used correctly. I wouldn’t want to discourage any teachers from engaging in social media in a positive and professional manner; however, teachers have a professional obligation to develop and maintain professional relationships.

I feel that the ‘grey area’ surrounds personal social media use. The greater majority of teachers are capable of maintaining professionalism when they are commenting on a social media site in the capacity as a teacher. What teachers must also be aware of is how they portray their ‘private’ lives on social media sites. It is important for teachers to think about how their post, image or video might reflect on themselves and their school. A golden rule that I think all teachers should live by when posting to social media sites is ‘Would I be happy for my principal or the chairperson of the board of trustees to see my post?’ If the answer is no then it is probably best that teachers think twice before posting. An excellent ‘Before you share – Guidelines’ can be found here. Very useful if you are wanting to consider writing guidelines around using social media for staff.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *